“She is dreaming of last night,” thought Jenny.

It was true she was; but one figure flitted more than all the rest through her visions. He presented flower after flower to her in that baseless morning dream, which was all too quickly ended. The night before, she had seen her dead mother in her sleep, and she wakened, weeping. And now she dreamed of Mr Bellingham, and smiled.

And yet, was this a more evil dream than the other?

The realities of life seemed to cut more sharply against her heart than usual that morning. The late hours of the preceding nights, and perhaps the excitement of the evening before, had indisposed her to bear calmly the rubs and crosses which beset all Mrs Mason’s young ladies at times.

For Mrs Mason, though the first dressmaker in the county, was human after all; and suffered, like her apprentices, from the same causes that affected them. This morning she was disposed to find fault with everything, and everybody. She seemed to have risen with the determination of putting the world and all that it contained (her world, at least) to rights before night; and abuses and negligences, which had long passed unreproved, or winked at, were to-day to be dragged to light, and sharply reprimanded. Nothing less than perfection would satisfy Mrs Mason at such times.”

Excerpt From: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell. “Ruth.” iBooks.
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I am hoping the dream will prove to be more evil than the other. If not, I’ll try to spin it charitably.

Regarding the sharp cutting realities of life, I have heard that cycles have their uses. There is a time for calmly bearing, but could there not also be a time for bud nipping? And if irritated impatience is a sin, Orthodox do not describe it as being human, but rather as succumbing to inherited weakness, which should be worked out of.

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